Autistic Children: 4 Hobbies That Can Turn Into Careers

Hobbies drop the mask of autistic children, who especially grow up with less positivity, and oblige them to perceive who they are and what they are while appreciating the true colors of life.

In most families, an autistic child is often handled like an unseen guest. It’s not because the parents don’t care, it’s because the impaired areas of child get more attention than his actual needs. On a constant basis, parents of autistic children do their utmost to provide their children as much happiness as possible and inject the extreme amount of positivity in their lives so that this world can become an ideal world for them. However, they often forget to focus on those areas that can save the wings of their children from catching fire in the future by building their career.

Hobbies are those areas of your child’s life that can either give scars to your child over and over or raise him as an elite person of the society while building his career. It won’t be far from the truth to say that hobbies are the only things that a child with autism can embrace happily at any stage of his life, because hobbies bring comfort and help the child to escape from the weird eyes of the society.

If you are supremely concerned about your child’s future, don’t entangle yourself in different kinds of misinformation which is often provided by our uninformed society. Just solely focus on introducing those hobbies in your child’s life that can turn into a career and result in betterment in the future. Focusing on just this area won’t only build the best future for your child but also teach him to socialize with other people.

4 Hobbies That Can Turn Into Careers

There must be something that your child enjoys doing again and again for fun, or for bringing predictability in his day-to-day life (which is very common in autism). All you need to do is to look for the career clues in his hobbies in order to move him in the appropriate direction so that he can naturally flourish himself while relishing his dominant mood. If you feel there is nothing special in his hobbies that can assist him to build his career in the future, then here I am presenting top four hobbies that you should introduce in his life, because these hobbies turn into the paid jobs and compel him to understand the meaning of his existence.

  • Golf: Autistic children count on the capacity of their mind, which is, in reality, relatively limited. Therefore, they mostly avoid going to those uproarious events which bombard their mind with too much information and result in their meltdown… Golf is a very relaxing hobby that soothes the feelings of an autistic child and opens up the world to him in the best possible manner. Ask John McCabe, who has started learning golf at the age of 7, about the spectacular changes that golf has brought into his life; golf helped him to socialize with new friends; he is now a senior and in the series of top golfers on the North Allegheny High School team. Occupational therapists also believe that golf helps an autistic child to learn motor, coordination, and social skills.
  • Photography: Children with autism often love to offer their thoughts through photography. They have the talent too to highlight the aesthetic appeal of the photographs. If your child has some interest in photography, then it’s time to carry this hobby further, since it has the potential to produce the finest amount of cash. In addition, photography doesn’t demand fast processing information in short-term working memory. It also helps the child to make new friends at work and injects immense amount of confidence in his personality which is so essential for his existence.
  • Graphic Designing: Graphic Designing is basically an art of communication. Every color, style, and image convey the actual message in the best possible manner. The most interesting thing about this hobby is that, it can help your child to build a business from home. Children, who are especially nonverbal and rely on their visual power, can do wonders in this field of art as they view this world differently from us; the diversity of their experiences breaks the silence of their personality by turning their perception into tangible reality. It’s a must for you to encourage your child and develop his drawing skills if he has the ability in the field of art as your this move can give him a satisfying life in the future.
  • Writing: If he’s good with his words, he can sell his words! Some autistic children have aesthetic ability to spread the atmosphere of heaven through their words. Donna Williams is one of the names who have unlocked society’s mind to what it means to be an autistic. Her book, “Nobody Nowhere” became an international bestseller… It won’t be far from the reality to say that only around 10 percent of autistic children have the potential to become an amazing writer in the future, since most autistic children are loners, or have low self-esteem. On the other hand, some autistic children have problems with handwriting skills too. However, if you feel your child can win the world through his words, then inspire him to do that, because writing can turn his future into gold.

Promising Future

Our society is uninformed and unprepared to support millions of autistic children; there is no doubt about it. However, the good news is that, various surveys have demonstrated time and time again that autistic children show improvement and thrive in the society as they grow up. If your child is autistic, don’t worry about it; he definitely has a promising future. Just strengthen the self-esteem of your child and tangle him up in career-building hobbies, because this will give him the best chance to live a happy, promising life, even when you’re gone.

Swing Therapy For Autistic Children

Most of us have no problem combining all our senses. For autistic children (and grownups) however, it’s a mighty challenging task. Processing stimuli from the senses of sight, smell, sound, touch, taste, balance and body is overwhelming. Those suffering from autism will often withdraw to avoid over stimulation, or try to sort out the input from their senses with self-developed soothing mechanisms and repetitive behaviours.

A significant amount of occupational therapy for autism focuses on sensory integration through specially designed programs. Some of the greatest tools for sensory integration therapy for autism type disorders are various types of swings. People with various autism spectrum disorders such as Autism, PDD, ADHD, Asperger’s, proprioceptive dysfunction and tactile defensiveness will benefit from using swings as part of their therapy.

Additionally, children and adults with Sensory Processing Disorders (also called Sensory Integration Disorders), especially those with proprioceptive or vestibular dysfunction, should definitely have swings or therapy hammocks as a crucial element of their treatment.

The benefits of the hammock can be two-fold. Children who find the smooth, swaying motion soothing, will relax and unwind while using it. However, children who have a vestibular dysfunction will feel uneasy while in the hammock and might initially protest its use. For them, hammock therapy is more about regaining equilibrium and learning to tolerate vestibular stimuli.

The motion of swinging restores balance to the vestibular system, provides proprioceptive input (deep pressure) and generally helps autistic-spectrum children feel more “in balance”. The soothing motion of swinging soothes, relaxes and increases concentration. Children who have trouble focusing on tasks such as reading or math, might find it easier to concentrate sitting in a hammock chair, their bodies engaged in a soothing motion.

Setting up a swing in the home is easy and does not require a large investment. A hammock, hammock chair, hanging bag or a therapy platform swing are all relatively inexpensive, easy to find and do not take up a lot of room. Making a platform swing out of a hammock is an easy do-it-yourself project, with instructions available in our blog. Put one in the child’s room, playroom or family room for a retreat or a therapy corner for an autistic child.

The Value of Part-Time Employment and Autistic Adults

Employment is a major area of concern for adults on the autism spectrum. While some companies have targeted employees with autism for various job openings, others continue to cling to past stereotypes and limiting beliefs. Sometimes solutions to a problem are right in front of us, literally, yet for myriad reasons we can’t see them. Such is the case for many employers who can’t fill job openings because they are having difficulty finding qualified workers. There are several contributing factors, when combined, that makes this a thorny issue for companies. First, many of the really hard jobs to fill are part-time positions with no benefits. This is an important point of distinction that often goes unmentioned, when employment statistics are presented by state and federal agencies. Moreover, those same positions are often entry level, offering little or no opportunity for career advancement. The reality is there is a plethora of talent – but very little interest on the part of potential employees.

The robust economy is frequently identified as the reason for a shortage of qualified employees. To some extent this is true, but it does not explain why those positions are available even when the job market slows down. This scenario seems custom made for adults with autism for a number of reasons. The fact that there are a number of part-time job openings available is significant, as it pertains to adults on the autism spectrum. In many instances, adults with autism can only work part-time due to physical or financial restraints. Those who receive Social Security and Medicaid are permitted to earn additional income up to a certain limit without jeopardizing those benefits. The idea of earning extra money is appealing to some people with autism as they pursue living an independent lifestyle. Maintaining government benefits is an integral part of the equation that offers flexibility and income. In addition, part-time employment is often best suited for autistic adults because of secondary physical conditions which preclude working full time.

Managing underlying medical conditions is an accepted part of life for some people with autism. Time consuming obligations such as standing therapy appointments, mental health counseling, regular doctor visits regarding digestive issues, and coping with myriad sensory challenges are all common. The truth is so many autistic adults simply can’t work a full time job because of the time required to manage health concerns. The timing could not be better for both adults on the spectrum and companies seeking to fill part-time positions. This is the ultimate win-win for all involved as businesses can fill hard to place, and often repetitive, entry level positions. On the other hand, this is a legitimate chance to constructively address the dismal unemployment rate among autistic adults, which currently hovers around 80%.

The argument could be made that this is highly speculative as there just isn’t a large body of evidence to support this theory. However, the present course we’re on clearly is not working – at least for the majority of autistic adults. Society is not the shining example of inclusion when we have people with autism who possess amazing talent not participating in the labor market. Some modifications within the work place will be necessary, but such adaptations have proven extremely successful in the past. Moreover, the long range goals are encouraging as employers learn more about the nuances of autism and the unique skills they offer. For companies willing to invest in training and a supportive environment for autistic workers, the outcome can be very rewarding. Sometimes the solutions to problems that appear to be monumental are right in front of us, just waiting for an invitation.